menu

Mobile Search

You are here

You are here

Added: 2 weeks 2 days ago
589 Views

Share this story

DP leader, Norbert Mao, contends with fractious party as opposition to his leadership mounts
Serving his second term after his re-election in 2015, Mao will need to rely on his political instinct to cultivate a working relationship with his rivals if he is to build grassroots and the vibrancy of the party.

As Democratic Party President-General tries to stamp out creeping internal dissent, he will need not only to rally his loyalists to his side but try to win support amongst moderate critics .

While speaking to the media on Wednesday at Rubaga cathedral shortly after prayers to honour the late Energy minister, Dr Andrew Lutakoome Kayiira, Mao said its high time the party identifies those who are against its leadership.

Mao’s comments underpinned his growing frustration with those who have outrightly rejected his leadership and the others who continue to sit on the fence while criticising him.

Mao has on a number of occasions attempted to dispense an olive branch to his rivals but often these efforts have not paid off. But his critics say Mao should not tire to reach out to his rivals.

Since he was first elected as leader of DP on February 21 2010, Mao has been attempting to deal with internal revolts largely from Buganda, which is viewed as the cradle of the party.

The latest accusation from his critics originate from the actions perceived as his closest allies. One of those is DP Vice-President Mukasa Mbidde whose endorsement by the president as a good man, according to Mao’s rivals, was a tacit approval of his dealings with the regime.

The appointment of party Chairperson Mohammed Kezaala to the position of deputy ambassador has provided fodder that the Mao led administration lacks the mettle to resist crumbs from the ruling party.

Yet others believe DP’s challenges are symptomatic of the a young multi-party political system where disagreements often blight party cohesion and limit progressive actions of the party.Serving his second term after his re-election in 2015, Mao will need to rely on his political instinct to cultivate a working relationship with his rivals if he is to build grassroots and the vibrancy of the party.