menu

Mobile Search

You are here

You are here

Added: 6 months 2 weeks ago
1,683 Views
Using harvested rainwater for fish farming
Unlike in swampy areas where there is a constant flow of water, his fish ponds, which are on on dry land, need another source and so Ssebuufu harvests rain water for his fish farm.

In 1987, Pastor David Ssebuufu relocated from Luwero to Jinja district to start a church. In addition to his pastoral duties, he discovered an interest in fish farming, following in his father’s agricultural footsteps. 

27 years later, Ssebuufu started commercial fish farming on his own after he bought a piece of land in Buikwe District. He has two man-made fish ponds with nearly 15,000 tilapia.

Unlike in swampy areas where there is a constant flow of water, his fish ponds, which are on on dry land, need another source and so Sebuufu harvests rain water for his fish farm. To ensure that water in the pond has enough oxygen, Ssebuufu uses a machine to purify it.

Sebuufu says that there are signs on must be aware of, that show that the water in the ponds needs a a change. It is recommended that the water in the ponds should be green. To maintain this color, Sebuufu uses chicken droppings.This waste, in addition to giving the water a green hue, is food for the fish.

Ssebuufu maintains that as long as the farmer monitors the cleanliness of the rainwater (or piped water) in the ponds and the healthy oxygen levels are maintained, fish farming can be a lucrative commercial ventures even in areas where there is no naturally flowing water.

 

Similar Stories